3200 Years Of History In One Picture.

3200 Years Of History In One Picture…

Thankfully, no loggers took it down, nor forest fires or earthquakes. Just a quiet life in a California forest for all these years

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Not every tree has a nickname, but ‘The President’ has earned it. This giant sequoia stands at 247 feet tall & is estimated to be over 3,200 years old.

Imagine, this tree was already 700 years old during the height of ancient Greece’s civilization and 1200 years old when Jesus lived and Rome was well into its rule of most of the western world and points beyond.

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The trunk of The President measures at 27 feet across, with 2 BILLION needles From base to top.

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Because of its unbelievable size, this tree has never been photographed in its entirety, until now.

National Geographic photographers have worked along with scientists to try and create the first photo that shows the President in all its glory.

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They had to Climb the tree with pulleys and levers, and took thousands of photos. Of those, they selected 126 and stitched them together, to get this incredible portrait of the President. And here it is:

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The man standing near the trunk of the tree is a good indicator of the tree’s size.

Incredible, isn’t it?

Your Real Estate Market Snapshot for July 2017 from SFAR

July 2017Snip20170816_2

How long can the residential real estate market go on like this? We are about two years into a national trend of dropping housing supply and increasing median sales prices. There are some regional variations to the story, but the shift to a predominantly seller’s market is mostly complete. Multiple-offer situations over asking price are commonplace in many communities, and good homes are routinely off the market after a single day. It is evident that a favorable economy keeps hungry buyers in the chase.

New Listings were down 28.9 percent for single family homes and 20.4 percent for Condo/TIC/Coop properties. Pending Sales remained flat for single family homes but decreased 19.0 percent for Condo/TIC/Coop properties.

The Median Sales Price was up 9.7 percent to $1,431,000 for single family homes and 12.4 percent to $1,175,000 for Condo/TIC/Coop properties. Months Supply of Inventory decreased 36.0 percent for single family units and 32.3 percent for Condo/TIC/Coop units.

Although the unemployment rate remains unchanged at its favorable national 4.3 percent rate, wage growth has not been rising at the steady clip that would be expected in an improving economy. Sales activity manages to keep churning along despite looming shortages in new construction. Lower price ranges are starting to feel the effects of the supply and demand gap, as first-time buyers scramble to get offers in at an increasing pace.

Click here for full report: SFAR_MarketFocus_2017-July

Your Real Estate Market Snapshot for June 2017 from SFAR

There has been a general slowdown in sales across the country, and this cannot be blamed on negative economic news. Unemployment remains low and wage growth, though nothing to overly celebrate, has held steady or increased for several years in a row. There is strong demand for home buying, emphasized by higher prices and multiple offers on homes for sale in many submarkets. As has been the case for month after month – and now year after year – low inventory is the primary culprit for any sales malaise rather than lack of offers.Snip20170717_4

New Listings were down 18.1 percent for single family homes and 36.0 percent for Condo/TIC/Coop properties. Pending Sales increased 6.6 percent for single family homes and 7.3 percent for Condo/TIC/Coop properties.

The Median Sales Price was up 10.8 percent to $1,468,000 for single family homes but decreased 2.6 percent to $1,145,000 for Condo/TIC/Coop properties. Months Supply of Inventory decreased 30.4 percent for single family units and 40.0 percent for Condo/TIC/Coop units.

With job creation increasing and mortgage rates remaining low, the pull toward homeownership is expected to continue. Yet housing starts have been drifting lower, and some are beginning to worry that a more serious housing shortage could be in the cards if new construction and building permit applications continue to come in lower in year-over-year comparisons while demand remains high. Homebuilder confidence suggests otherwise, so predictions of a gloomy future should be curbed for the time being.

Click here for full report: SFAR_MarketFocus_2017-June

Your Real Estate Market Snapshot for May 2017 from SFAR

Home prices across the U.S. are reaching all-time highs, prompting worry over another boom-and-bust scenario like we experienced roughly ten years ago. Yet, as we glance across the state of residential real estate, what is clear compared to the last extended run of price increases is that lending standards are now much stronger than they were before. Incomes must be verified, a reasonable amount of money must be paid toward the home prior to purchase and a more stringent loan approval process is in place to prevent a repeat performance of the Great Recession.

Snip20170618_1New Listings were down 7.4 percent for single family homes and 18.4 percent for Condo/TIC/Coop properties. Pending Sales decreased 4.0 percent for single family homes but increased 6.3 percent for Condo/TIC/Coop properties.

 

The Median Sales Price was up 12.0 percent to $1,512,338 for single family homes and 10.9 percent to $1,200,000 for Condo/TIC/Coop properties. Months Supply of Inventory decreased 24.0 percent for single family units and 25.0 percent for Condo/TIC/Coop units.

In addition to a stronger base upon which to conduct real estate transactions, the overall economy is in better shape than it was a decade ago. More jobs are available, unemployment is relatively low and workers have more faith in their wages and the potential for wage increases. Although we continue to battle an inventory shortage in much of the country, optimism remains high for a successful summer for buying and selling homes.

Click here for full report: SFAR_MarketFocus_2017-May

The Future

A dear friend of mine forwarded this bit of startling information!  Our world is indeed changing faster than we notice while we are going through our daily activities, “just riding the bus” so to speak.
Best wishes for a Happy and Prosperous New Year!

 

The FUTURE is approaching faster than one can handle….!  ?????

In 1998, Kodak had 170,000 employees and sold 85% of all photo paper worldwide.

Within just a few years, their business model disappeared and they went bankrupt.

What happened to Kodak will happen in a lot of industries in the next 10 years and, most people won’t see it coming. Did you think in 1998 that 3 years later you would never take pictures on film again?

Yet digital cameras were invented in 1975.  The first ones only had 10,000 pixels, but followed Moore’s law.  So as with all exponential technologies, it was a disappointment for a time, before it became way superior and became mainstream in only a few short years.  It will now happen  again with Artificial Intelligence, health, autonomous and  electric cars, education, 3Dprinting, agriculture and  jobs.   Welcome to the 4th Industrial Revolution.  Welcome to the Exponential Age.      

Software will disrupt most traditional industries in the next 5-10 years.

Uber is just a software tool, they don’t own any cars, and are now the biggest taxi company in the  world.

 

Airbnb is now the biggest hotel company in the world, although they don’t own any properties.

Artificial Intelligence:  Computers become exponentially better in understanding the world. This year, a computer beat the best Go-player in the world, 10 years earlier than expected.

In the U.S., young lawyers already don’t get jobs. Because of IBM’s Watson, you can get legal advice  (so far for more or less basic stuff) within seconds, with 90% accuracy compared with 70% accuracy when done by humans.

So if you study law, stop immediately.  There will be 90% less lawyers in the future, only specialists will remain.

Watson already helps nurses diagnosing cancer, it’s times more accurate than human nurses.

Facebook now has a pattern recognition software that can recognize faces better than humans.  In 2030, computers will become more intelligent than humans. (NEVER!/Albert)

Autonomous  cars: In 2018 the first self driving cars  will appear for the public. Around 2020, the complete industry will start to be disrupted. You don’t want to own a car anymore. You will call a car with your phone, it will show up at your location and drive you to your destination. You will not need to park it, you only pay for the driven distance and can be productive while driving.

Our kids will never get a driver’s license and will never own a car.

It will change the cities, because we will need 90-95% less cars for that.  We can transform former parking spaces into parks.

1.2 million people die each year in car accidents worldwide. We now have one accident every 60,000 miles  (100,000 km), with autonomous driving that will drop to accident in 6 million miles  (10 million km). That will save a million lives each year.

Most car companies will probably become bankrupt. Traditional car companies try the evolutionary approach and just build a better car, while tech companies (Tesla, Apple, Google) will do the revolutionary approach and build a computer on wheels.

Many engineers from Volkswagen and Audi are completely terrified of Tesla.

Insurance companies will have massive trouble because without accidents, the insurance will become 100x cheaper. Their car insurance business model will disappear.

Real estate will change.  Because if you can work while you commute, people will move further away to live in a more beautiful neighbourhood.

Electric cars will become mainstream about 2020.  Cities will be less noisy because all new cars will run on electricity.

Electricity will become incredibly cheap and clean:  Solar production has been on an exponential curve for 30 years, but you can now see the burgeoning impact.

Last year, more solar energy was installed worldwide than fossil.  Energy companies are desperately trying to limit  access to the grid to prevent competition from home solar  installations, but that can’t last.  Technology will take care of that strategy.

With cheap electricity comes cheap and abundant water. Desalination of salt water now only needs 2kWh per cubic meter (@ 0.25 cents). We don’t have scarce water in most places, we only have scarce drinking water.   Imagine what will be possible if anyone can have as much clean water as he wants, for nearly no cost.

Health: The Tricorder X price  will be announced this year.  There are companies who will build a medical device (called the “Tricorder” from Star Trek) that works with your phone, which takes your retina scan, your blood sample  and you breath into it.

It then analyses 54 bio-markers that will identify nearly any disease.  It will be cheap, so in a few years everyone on this planet will have access to world class medical analysis, nearly for free Goodbye, medical  establishment.

3D printing: The price of the cheapest 3D printer came down from  $18,000 to $400 within 10 years. In the same time, it became 100 times faster. All major shoe companies have already started 3D printing  shoes.

Some spare airplane parts are already 3D printed in remote airports.  The space station now has a printer that eliminates the need for the large amount of spare parts they used to have in the past.

At the end of this year, new smart phones will have 3D scanning possibilities.  You can then 3D scan your feet and print your perfect shoe at home.

In China, they already  3D printed and built a  complete 6-storey office building.  By  202710% of everything that’s being   produced will be 3D printed.

Business  opportunities: If you think of a niche  you want to go in, first ask yourself: “In the future, do I think we will have that?” and if the answer is yes, how can you make that happen sooner?

If it doesn’t work with your phone, forget the idea.  And any idea designed for success in the 20th century is doomed to failure in the 21st century.

Work70-80% of jobs will disappear in  the next 20 years. There will be a lot of new jobs, but it is not clear if there will be enough new jobs in such a short time.  This will require a rethink on wealth distribution.              

Agriculture: There will be a  $100 agricultural robot in the future.  Farmers in 3rd world countries can then  become managers of their field instead of working all day on their  fields.

Aeroponics will need much less water.  The first Petri dish produced veal, is now available and will be cheaper than cow produced veal in 2018. Right now, 30% of all agricultural surfaces are used for cows. Imagine if we don’t need that space anymore.

There are several start-ups who will bring insect protein to the market shortly.  It contains more protein than meat. It will be labeled as “alternative protein source”  (because most people still reject the idea of eating insects).

There is an app called “moodies” which can already tell in which mood youre in. By 2020 there will be apps that can tell by your facial expressions, if you are lying.  Imagine a political debate where it’s being displayed when theyre telling the truth and when theyre not.

Your Real Estate Market Snapshot for September 2016 from SFAR

Posted by Charlene Delaney

As anticipated at the outset of the year, demand has remained high through the first three quarters of 2016, propping up sales and prices despite heavy reductions in inventory and months of supply across the country. With rental prices and employment opportunities in a consistent climb, year-over-year increases in home buying are prosept-snapshotbable for the rest of the year but not guaranteed.

New Listings were down 1.5 percent for single family homes and 11.6 percent for Condo/TIC/Coop properties. Pending Sales decreased 9.0 percent for single family homes and 2.3 percent for Condo/TIC/Coop properties.

The Median Sales Price was up 5.4 percent to $1,216,875 for single family homes but decreased 2.6 percent to $1,012,500 for Condo/TIC/Coop properties. Months Supply of Inventory increased 4.2 percent for single family units and 14.8 percent for Condo/TIC/Coop units.

In general, today’s demand is driven by three factors: Millennials are reaching prime home-buying age, growing families are looking for larger homes and empty nesters are downsizing. However, intriguingly low interest rates often prompt refinancing instead of listing, contributing to lower inventory. Recent studies have also shown that short-term rentals are keeping a collection of homes off the market.

Click here for full report: sfar_marketfocus_2016-sept